In the Media

City officials and activists file briefs for release of Pantaleo misconduct record

09/08/2016
Amsterdam News

At a news conference held at City Hall Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2016, activists announced that city officials, along with Eric Garner’s mother, Gwen Carr, and community organizations filed a legal action supporting the release of a summary misconduct record of NYPD officer Daniel Pantaleo, the officer who held Eric Garner in a fatal and prohibited chokehold in July 2014.

Council got played in its deal with the police

We need a law, not the NYPD's word, to change the way cops search New Yorkers
08/16/2016
Crain's New York
Richard Aborn’s op-ed “Give the NYPD a chance to reform itself” is perplexing, describing City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito’s backroom deal as both weaker than what the speaker has portrayed and stronger than its factual impact. Either he is confused or being disingenuous. The speaker’s deal does not “adopt most” of the Right to Know Act as Mr. Aborn insinuates. In fact, it adopts very little because it has removed the most important reforms, including those highlighted by Mr. Aborn as recommended by President Obama’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing (which he misnames and incorrectly implies took a position opposed to legislation).

Watchdog: NYPD needs more transparency on misconduct cases

08/15/2016
Newsday

A government watchdog laid out a proposal Monday for greater transparency of NYPD operations and accountability for officer actions.

Citizens Union released an 18-point policy statement that, among other goals, seeks to establish consistency across the police oversight system and expand the range of disciplinary options for cases of officer misconduct.

The group’s executive director, Dick Dadey, said the introduction of a new police commissioner, James O’Neill, next month opens a door to improved NYPD-community relations.

Good-government groups blast backroom deal that sank police-reform bills

Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito mothballed two police-reform bills after reaching a private agreement with police leaders last month
08/15/2016
Crain's New York

Good-government and police-reform groups blasted the City Council’s “handshake agreement”with the Police Department Monday as “irresponsible” and “not how the City Council should act,” in the words of Citizens Union’s Dick Dadey.

Looking at the Bratton Era in NYC Through a Clear Lens

The outgoing police commissioner is seen by the community he leaves behind as a mixed bag when it comes to law enforcement and civilian relations
08/12/2016
Ebony

A flood of predictable reactions — from police and protest circles — greeted the announcement Tuesday that New York Police Commissioner William J. Bratton is leaving the post in September. The 68-year-old is the most influential American law enforcement executive in modern times, the author of policing strategies that have shaped relations between police and the communities they serve, for better and for worse.

Procedural Move Could Lead to Vote on Right to Know Act

08/12/2016
Gotham Gazette

Last week, City Council Members Ritchie Torres and Antonio Reynoso sent out a joint statement in which they addressed the ramifications of the impending retirement of NYPD Commissioner Bill Bratton. “With the departure of William Bratton,” the statement reads, “we are reminded that administrative agreements are every bit as short-lived as commissioners themselves, coming and going in the moments we least expect.”

New NYPD Commissioner's Focus on Community Policing is a Distraction, Not a Solution

08/11/2016
The Intercept_

WHEN NEW YORK MAYOR Bill de Blasio introduced incoming Police Commissioner James O’Neill last week, he praised him as the “architect” of neighborhood policing — the city’s version of the “community policing” approach being implemented across the country as a solution to the increasingly contentious relationship between law enforcement and people of color.

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