In the Media

Top cop retires, ending tough-on-crime era in NYC. What's next?

BRIDGING THE DIVIDE: Commissioner Bratton steps down after four decades of reducing crime in New York, Boston, and Los Angeles. But in the wake of protests and shootings, many police departments are now working on rebuilding trust with their communities.
09/17/2016
Christian Science Monitor
NEW YORK — On Friday, New York Police Commissioner Bill Bratton will step down after a 45-year career that made him perhaps the most influential police officer of the past half century.
 
He oversaw a breathtaking reduction in crime in New York and ushered in safer streets in Boston and Los Angeles. He championed techniques that in many ways revolutionized American policing. Yet, there is a sense today that his towering reputation should come with an asterisk.
 

The outgoing chief of the largest US police force took a final shot at police reform advocates

09/16/2016
Business Insider

New York City police commissioner Bill Bratton stepped down from his post on Friday, and gave a parting snub to his critics in a New York Times op-ed.

"There are police reformers from outside the profession who think that changing police culture is a matter of passing regulations, establishing oversight bodies and more or less legislating a new order. It is not," Bratton wrote.

James O’Neill, incoming NYPD commissioner, has expert opinions split

09/16/2016
amNewYork

Incoming NYPD Commissioner James O’Neill is inheriting historically low crime numbers.

But he’s also facing years of bumpy relations with the community, controversy over the department’s use of broken windows-style policing and the waning aftermath of a federal corruption investigation.

As an officer who came up through the ranks, heralded as the “architect” of the latest iteration of community policing, many say Jimmy — no one calls him James — is uniquely qualified for the job.

City officials and activists file briefs for release of Pantaleo misconduct record

09/07/2016
Amsterdam News

At a news conference held at City Hall Tuesday, Sept. 6, 2016, activists announced that city officials, along with Eric Garner’s mother, Gwen Carr, and community organizations filed a legal action supporting the release of a summary misconduct record of NYPD officer Daniel Pantaleo, the officer who held Eric Garner in a fatal and prohibited chokehold in July 2014.

Pols, activists join legal battle over revealing any actions against cop who choked Eric Garner

09/05/2016
New York Daily News

Pull back the curtain!

So says a group of elected officials and activist groups that will file briefs Tuesday in support of a two-year legal battle to get the city to release the disciplinary records of the cop who fatally choked Eric Garner back in 2014, organizers said.

The effort is being mounted by Garner's mother Gwen Carr, members of the City Council, Public Advocate Letitia James and Communities United for Police Reform, a nonprofit dedicated to greater police accountability.

Controversial NYPD Reform Bill Blocked by Speaker Now Has Veto-Proof Majority Support

08/26/2016
Observer

hotly contested measure that would obligate cops give their name, rank and command during most routine stops now has enough backers it could theoretically override a veto by Mayor Bill de Blasio—if his ally Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito would ever let it get a vote on the City Council floor.

Homeless to Mayor: Keep your promises

08/25/2016
Amsterdam News

Homeless New Yorkers and their advocates want New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio to own up to his promise to them.

Last Thursday, outside of City Hall, members of Picture the Homeless, Communities United for Police Reform, the New York Civil Liberties Union, the Justice Committee and FIERCE (an organization that caters to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer youth of color in New York City) demanded that police abuse against homeless people end and that the mayor adopt cost-effective housing solutions by using city-owned lots to construct housing.

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