In the Media

NYPD cop who killed Delrawn Small was 'callous' in road-rage fit

10/23/2017
New York Daily News

The family of a Brooklyn man who an NYPD officer gunned down in a road rage incident broke down in tears as jurors were shown a photo of his bloody corpse.

Officer Wayne Isaacs faces 25 years to life in prison if convicted of murder in what prosecutors called the “callous” and “indifferent” killing of Delrawn Small early on July 4, 2016, on Atlantic Ave. in East New York.

Assistant Attorney General Jose Nieves made his opening argument Monday in the trial, in which Isaacs claims the shooting of the 37-year-old Small was justified because he feared for his life.

Trial to Begin for Off-Duty Officer Charged in Fatal Traffic Dispute

10/22/2017
New York Times

Opening arguments are scheduled to begin on Monday in the trial of a New York City police officer who shot and killed a motorist in a traffic dispute as he headed home from work last year in Brooklyn.

Wayne Isaacs is the first police officer in the state to be tried under an executive order that gave the attorney general the power to investigate and prosecute officers for civilian deaths at their hands or in their custody.

Losing a Brother: Victoria Davis and Victor Dempsey Fight for ‘The Right to Know' Law

Why the families of people killed by police are holding "Take a Knee" actions to highlight their demands for transparency.
10/17/2017
BillMoyers.com

"On July 4, 2016, NYPD officer Wayne Isaacs shot and killed my brother, Delrawn Small, and left him to die in the street without assistance. Wayne Isaacs was still sitting in the car when he shot Delrawn.

"My family is demanding that Isaacs be held accountable [for killing our brother]. But we also know that holding one officer accountable will not end police violence. We need strong policy changes to help end abusive policing in New York City. Our family is demanding the Right to Know Act be passed and [for] Wayne Isaacs to be held accountable as civilians are always held accountable." - Victoria Davis, sister of Delrawn Small

Pass the "Right to Know" Act Now, Demand Families of People Killed by New York City Police

10/13/2017
Truthout

We're now several months into the Trump administration, and activists have scored some important victories in those months. Yet there is always more to be done, and for many people, the question of where to focus and how to help remains. In this series, we talk with organizers, agitators, and educators, not only about how to resist, but how to build a better world. Today's interview is the 82nd in the series. Click here for the most recent interview before this one.

City Council must pass police reform before year ends

10/12/2017
Amsterdam News

The people in my community of Flushing, Queens, like New Yorkers in various other neighborhoods across the city, are tired of getting targeted and harassed by the NYPD. Police frequently approach people without identifying themselves or providing any justification. Despite the decline in the number of reported stops by the NYPD, there are many policing interactions initiated by officers that are going unrecorded. In these incidents, officers just do whatever they want without any accountability or transparency.

Exigen al Concejo que apruebe el Acta del “Derecho a saber” para frenar abusos de la policía

10/11/2017
El Diario

La llamada ley del “Derecho a saber”, una iniciativa que exige que los policías se identifiquen ante los sospechosos con sus nombres propios y de paso se les informe sobre las razones por las cuales están siendo detenidos y su derecho a rechazar el registro si no hay causa probable, vuelve a estar sobre la mesa, faltando apenas tres meses para que termine la sesión actual del Concejo Municipal.

Sponsors vow to pass cop transparency bills

10/11/2017
AM New York

Sponsors of two bills — one forcing NYPD cops in nonemergencies to identify themselves by name and rank, and the other requiring them to tell those they want to search of their constitutional right to deny a voluntary request — vowed Wednesday to pass both by the new year.

Nearly 1,000 supporters of the legislation, which have languished since 2014 but have veto-proof support in the City Council, picketed outside City Hall Wednesday to demand the city enact the bills.

“We deserve the right to know! Abusive cops have got to go!” the demonstrators chanted.

Family of Delrawn Small says trial date for officer who killed him ‘bittersweet’

Pre-trial hearings for the off-duty officer who fatally shot Delrawn Small wrapped up on Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017. Above, Victoria Davis, Smalls' sister, speaks after the final pre-trial hearing. (Credit: Alison Fox)
09/13/2017
amNewYork

Small’s brother, Victor Dempsey, said setting a trial date is a step in the right direction, but it’s not the end for his family.


“It’s bittersweet,” he said. “It’s not going to be over. Unfortunately, we have to think of all the holidays that are going to come up, we have to think of the school year starting and ending for his kids. So yeah, we can get a trial and we’re asking for a speedy trial. ... What happens after that is we continue to fight. What happens after that is we continue to make sure that everyone’s held accountable, especially the NYPD, the mayor, everybody that’s part of this legal system.”

Fatal NYPD Shooting Reveals Weak Policies, Ineffective Discipline

Emotionally disturbed man shot and killed before any trained professionals could arrive.
08/01/2017
Reason.com

Police in Brooklyn shot and killed Dwayne Jeune after his mother had called 911 for help for her son, who reportedly had a history of mental illness.

The officers did not appear to follow NYPD procedures, NYC civil rights activist Keegan Stephan noted, and at least one of them, Miguel Gonzales, was involved in a similar shooting a year ago without receiving appropriate additional training in its aftermath.

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