In the Media

The End of the Bratton Era

A new generation of chiefs favors a lighter touch.
08/02/2016
The Marshall Project

A flood of predictable reactions — from police and protest circles — greeted the announcement Tuesday that New York Police Commissioner William J. Bratton is leaving the post in September. The 68-year-old is the most influential American law enforcement executive in modern times, the author of policing strategies that have shaped relations between police and the communities they serve, for better and for worse.

NYPD Commissioner William Bratton to Step Down

New York's top cop is leaving after a sometimes rocky tenure... Read more on JetMag.com: http://www.jetmag.com/news/william-bratton-nypd/#ixzz4GIX6M6ni Follow us: @getjetmag on Twitter | GetJetMag on Facebook
08/02/2016
JET Magazine (blog)

After a rocky tenure in which he brought down crime, but also dealt with tension between police and people of color, New York City Police Commissioner William Bratton is leaving his job.

Bratton, whose departure was announced Tuesday, will leave next month to become a risk and security adviser at Teneo, a consulting firm. James O’Neill, the department’s top chief, will replace him as commissioner.

Cop's use of force against Bronx Assemblyman reminder of NYPD reform work to be done

08/01/2016
New York Daily News

On Saturday, Assembly Member Michael Blake, at an event in his district, was forcibly restrained by a NYPD officer while trying to gain information about an incident that was occurring. He was released after a senior officer recognized him as an elected official.

The incident has many remembering a situation that took place in 2011, when I and Kirsten John Foy, who was working for then Public Advocate Bill de Blasio, were detained by police during the West Indian Day Parade.

Jews of color hold Black Lives Matter march Downtown

08/01/2016
Brooklyn Daily

Jews must support the Black Lives Matter movement to fight for the rights of people of color in their own religion, said dozens of Jewish activists who rallied for police reform Downtown on July 28.

“Black Lives Matter is a Jewish issue because there are black Jews,” said April Baskin, vice president of the Union for Reform Judaism congregation, who came all the way from D.C. for the event. “The freedom and safety of black people is tied to our Jewish values for justice and safety for everyone. Our country collectively has not been vocal enough.”

Tonight: ‘Jews for Black Lives Action & Vigil’ To Call For Police Reform

07/28/2016
Park Slope Stoop

The organization Jews for Racial and Economic Justice (JFREJ) will hold a rally this evening (Thursday, July 28) which will begin at 7pm in front of the Barclays Center. The rally will then proceed down Atlantic Avenue towards Brooklyn Heights. The march will culminate in front of the Brooklyn Detention Complex at 275 Atlantic Avenue, where mourners plan to light Yarzheit candles for those lost to police violence.

The NYPD Is Already a Small Army—Now It Is Hyping Terror Threats to Militarize Even More

"You name it, we are buying it," says NYPD Chief Bill Bratton as city purchases $7.5 million in military-style gear.
07/26/2016
Alternet

The NYPD is already the largest and most well-resourced police force in the United States, with more than 34,000 officers on its payroll and a budget that hovers over $5 billion annually.

New York City Policing Reform, Derailed

07/25/2016
New York Times

Two years ago this month, Eric Garner was gang-tackled and smothered by New York City police officers on a Staten Island sidewalk. His death helped to spark a national outcry and a push for better ways of policing the police. Among the reforms sought by the New York City Council are two bills to protect civilians from being harassed and unlawfully searched.

Bill Bratton lowered crime, but legacy shows he was out of ideas

07/25/2016
New York Daily News

When NYPD Commissioner Bill Bratton eventually leaves 1 Police Plaza, he will be remembered for the innovative CompStat program and its data-driven approach to fighting crime.

But critics said it was time for new ideas — and he was fresh out of them.

“He realizes there have to be changes and many of those changes he’s not comfortable with,” said Marq Claxton, director of the Black Law Enforcement Alliance, who worked for 20 years in the NYPD.

Pages