Right to Know Act

The Right To Know Act is a legislative package that aims to protect the civil and human rights of New Yorkers while promoting communication, transparency and accountability in everyday interactions between the NYPD and the public.  New Yorkers want to live in a safe city where the police treat all residents with dignity and respect, and where police are not considered to be above the law.

Three Actions NYC Mayor and Other Public Officials Must Take to Protect Its Citizens from Police Abuses

03/20/2017
Atlanta Black Star

In the weeks since Donald Trump won the presidential election and assumed office, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has sought every opportunity to present himself as opposed to Trump. While de Blasio has promoted his administration as a defender against Trump’s anti-immigrant and racist agenda, he has refused to take concrete action within his own power to protect New Yorkers.

A True Sanctuary City Requires Action to Change The NYPD

As New Yorkers resist the Trump administration’s racist, anti-immigrant, Islamophobic, and other discriminatory actions, it’s more urgent now than ever for New York’s elected and public officials to take action to protect our communities.  We saw some of that in Albany this week with the State Assembly passing criminal justice reform legislation, even as action is still needed in NYC to end broken windows policing and pass the Right to Know Act.

Over 130 Feminist Leaders & Organizations Urge NYC Elected Officials to Take Swift Action on Police Reform to Provide Protections for Women

Women continue to experience gender-specific police abuses and impending Trump administration make local action even more urgent, and city should demonstrate leadership with action

In letter to NYC Council Speaker Mark-Viverito, Public Safety Chair Gibson, and Women’s Caucus Co-Chairs Cumbo & Rosenthal, group encourages NYC’s women elected officials to lead efforts to pass Right to Know Act

Award-winning BRIC TV debuts revealing documentary on the Right To Know Act

12/13/2016
Brooklyn Daily Eagle

Since its inception last year, award-winning cable TV and digital network BRIC TV has strived to publicize and expose the lesser-known issues affecting Brooklyn.

From breaking segregation in schools to LQBTQ civil rights to the effects of gentrification, BRIC TV has provided a voice for those that often cannot be heard.

Key Accountability Reforms of the Right To Know Act

In July 2016, the New York Times reported that NYC Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito had agreed to a deal with then-NYPD Commissioner Bill Bratton in an attempt to prevent a vote on the Right to Know Act. The deal removed some of the most important protections of the Right to Know Act, including policies explicitly prioritized by the White House Task Force on 21st Century Policing, and its underlying foundation of accountability. The following fact sheet includes some of these key distinctions and further demonstrates why the NYC Council must pass the Right To Know Act to ensure meaningful and lasting reforms to protect all New Yorkers.

Broken Windows Policing | BK Live

10/07/2016
BRIC TV

The broken windows policing policy came into existence nationwide in the early 80s, with the intent to reduce criminal activity in what were known as "disruptive environments.'

To speak on the dated and problematic nature of the policies are Alex Vitale, a professor of sociology at Brooklyn College, Nahal Zamani, Program Manager at the Center for Constitutional Rights, and Anthonine Pierre, Community Organizer at the Brooklyn Movement Center.

Cops & Community: Innovations Around Policing Town Hall | #BHeard

10/06/2016
BRIC TV
The killings of unarmed black civilians by the police have sparked a nationwide conversation around race and police violence. What innovations are underway that can help us think differently about the role of law enforcement in our society? BRIC TV Senior Correspondent Brian Vines moderates a panel of luminaries about ideas around innovations around policing practices in our communities.

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