Right to Know Act

The Right To Know Act is a legislative package that aims to protect the civil and human rights of New Yorkers while promoting communication, transparency and accountability in everyday interactions between the NYPD and the public.  New Yorkers want to live in a safe city where the police treat all residents with dignity and respect, and where police are not considered to be above the law.

Communities United for Police Reform Responds to NYC Council Committee Vote on Police Reform Bill (Intro 541-C) & Bill That Undermines Police Accountability (Intro 182-D)

In response to the New York City Council Committee on Public Safety passing Intro 541-C and 182-D, Communities United for Police Reform released the following statement from spokesperson Monifa Bandele.

Communities United for Police Reform Releases Statement on Right to Know Act Bills

In response to Right to Know Act bills being laid to age last night for an impending vote, Communities United for Police Reform released the following statement from spokesperson Monifa Bandele.

Communities United for Police Reform Statement on Right to Know Act

In response to Right to Know Act lead sponsors, Council Members Antonio Reynoso and Ritchie Torres, failing to take action on the legislation at today’s Stated Meeting and an anonymously sourced report about a deal being on the table, Communities United for Police Reform released the following statement from spokesperson Monifa Bandele.

“There is no deal on the Right to Know Act without non-emergency investigatory policing encounters being covered, including when police are doing investigatory questioning at Level 1 encounters. If a police officer can ask you for identification in non-emergency situations, there is no reason New Yorkers should be left without the identity of the officer and the reason for the encounter in such situations. Any purported bill that seeks to provide such a gaping loophole has no agreement from advocates and communities.

De Blasio slammed for timing on controversial police reform bill

01/08/2018
New York Daily News

The mayor hastily added a hearing for a controversial police reform bill to his schedule Monday — at a time when many of the activists opposed to it were mourning Erica Garner.

Mayor de Blasio added the Right to Know Act to a slew of other, less contentious, bills getting hearings Monday — slipping the bills into an updated advisory he issued two hours before the event was to begin. Meanwhile, a funeral was being held for Garner, whose father Eric Garner was killed as a police officer used a chokehold while trying to arrest him on Staten Island in 2014.

De Blasio slammed for adding police reform bills to hearing last minute

01/08/2018
New York Post

Police-reform advocates on Monday slammed the de Blasio administration for waiting until the last minute before adding controversial police reform bills to a public hearing hosted by the mayor.

One measure in the Right to Know Act requires cops to get proof of consent from a person before searching them without a legal basis.

A second bill requires cops to ID themselves and provide business cards to suspects.

Melissa Mark-Viverito, a Mayor-Made Speaker, Sought a Member-Driven Legacy

12/30/2017
Gotham Gazette

Melissa Mark-Viverito, the first Latina to preside over the 51-member New York City Council, leaves office having shepherded a progressive shift in the city’s direction, in conjunction with fellow Democrat Mayor Bill de Blasio, a philosophically aligned partner in government who was the deciding factor in her winning the powerful speaker position four years ago.

Police accountability bills fall short for some activists

12/21/2017
News12

Two bills on police accountability passed by the City Council this week, but some activists who originally pushed for them say they aren't satisfied.

Intro 541 of the Right to Know Act requires officers to clearly explain that searches are completely voluntary and only allows searches if consent is given. The second bill, Intro 182, requires officers to identify themselves, offer a business card and provide an explanation for police activity.

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