Right to Know Act

The Right To Know Act is a legislative package that aims to protect the civil and human rights of New Yorkers while promoting communication, transparency and accountability in everyday interactions between the NYPD and the public.  New Yorkers want to live in a safe city where the police treat all residents with dignity and respect, and where police are not considered to be above the law.

Controversial NYPD Reform Bill Blocked by Speaker Now Has Veto-Proof Majority Support


hotly contested measure that would obligate cops give their name, rank and command during most routine stops now has enough backers it could theoretically override a veto by Mayor Bill de Blasio—if his ally Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito would ever let it get a vote on the City Council floor.

Criminal Justice Reforms Stall in a Liberal Capital: New York

New York Times

Utah, a state where even regular beer is considered too intoxicating, has made possession of heroin or cocaine a misdemeanor rather than a felony. Mississippi has reduced its prison population by 15 percent with new legislation.

Several states have decriminalized marijuana for recreational use. More than a half-dozen states have passed laws restricting the use of cellphone-tracking technology by the police.

La lucha por el ‘Derecho a Saber’ sigue

La Policía debe rendir cuentas
El Diario

La comunidad latina tiene que ser parte del movimiento nacional por la rendición de cuentas en los departamentos policíacos. Sufrimos abuso, brutalidad y asesinatos policiales de miembros de nuestra comunidad también, como parte de la manifestación de la violencia sistémica anti-Negro. En la ciudad de Nueva York, esa historia es trágicamente larga y continúa – Anthony Baez, Iman Morales, Noel Polanco, Jayson Tirado, y demasiados más han muerto a manos de la policía.

Council got played in its deal with the police

We need a law, not the NYPD's word, to change the way cops search New Yorkers
Crain's New York
Richard Aborn’s op-ed “Give the NYPD a chance to reform itself” is perplexing, describing City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito’s backroom deal as both weaker than what the speaker has portrayed and stronger than its factual impact. Either he is confused or being disingenuous. The speaker’s deal does not “adopt most” of the Right to Know Act as Mr. Aborn insinuates. In fact, it adopts very little because it has removed the most important reforms, including those highlighted by Mr. Aborn as recommended by President Obama’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing (which he misnames and incorrectly implies took a position opposed to legislation).

Good-government groups blast backroom deal that sank police-reform bills

Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito mothballed two police-reform bills after reaching a private agreement with police leaders last month
Crain's New York

Good-government and police-reform groups blasted the City Council’s “handshake agreement”with the Police Department Monday as “irresponsible” and “not how the City Council should act,” in the words of Citizens Union’s Dick Dadey.