Right to Know Act

The Right To Know Act is a legislative package that aims to protect the civil and human rights of New Yorkers while promoting communication, transparency and accountability in everyday interactions between the NYPD and the public.  New Yorkers want to live in a safe city where the police treat all residents with dignity and respect, and where police are not considered to be above the law.

Change of Commissioner Spotlights De Blasio’s Record on Police Reform

08/05/2016
Gotham Gazette

Many believe that the biggest responsibility of the Mayor of New York City is to keep people safe and Bill de Blasio has largely done that, in no small part by letting his lightning-rod police commissioner, Bill Bratton, call the shots on public safety policy. The mayor has focused on pre-kindergarten and affordable housing while Bratton has governed the streets, helping bring crime down to historic lows.

Incoming Commissioner James O'Neill says NYPD will follow Bill Bratton's lead in deal to avoid police reforms

08/04/2016
New York Daily News

Incoming Police Commissioner James O’Neill said he’ll stick to a controversial deal with the City Council on identification and search rules — prompting a clash with some police reform advocates before he’s even started the job.

O’Neill, the current Chief of Department who will take over for Bill Bratton, said he’d stick to the deal his predecessor made to avoid a vote on two bills called the Right to Know Act.

CPR Slams Chief O’Neill for Supporting Backroom Political Deal without Touted “Community Engagement”

In response to NYPD Chief James O’Neill, named successor to Commissioner Bratton, announcing his support for the deal Speaker Mark-Viverito and Commissioner Bratton struck in an attempt to block the Right to Know Act police reforms, Communities United for Police Reform released the following statement from spokesperson Mark Winston Griffith, executive director of Brooklyn Movement Center.

Jews of color hold Black Lives Matter march Downtown

08/01/2016
Brooklyn Daily

Jews must support the Black Lives Matter movement to fight for the rights of people of color in their own religion, said dozens of Jewish activists who rallied for police reform Downtown on July 28.

“Black Lives Matter is a Jewish issue because there are black Jews,” said April Baskin, vice president of the Union for Reform Judaism congregation, who came all the way from D.C. for the event. “The freedom and safety of black people is tied to our Jewish values for justice and safety for everyone. Our country collectively has not been vocal enough.”

Cop's use of force against Bronx Assemblyman reminder of NYPD reform work to be done

08/01/2016
New York Daily News

On Saturday, Assembly Member Michael Blake, at an event in his district, was forcibly restrained by a NYPD officer while trying to gain information about an incident that was occurring. He was released after a senior officer recognized him as an elected official.

The incident has many remembering a situation that took place in 2011, when I and Kirsten John Foy, who was working for then Public Advocate Bill de Blasio, were detained by police during the West Indian Day Parade.

CPR Responds to Bronx Incident of Abusive Policing of Assemblyman Michael Blake

In response to reports that New York State Assembly Member Michael Blake was subjected to an abusive policing encounter in the district he represents, Communities United for Police Reform released the following statement from spokesperson Monifa Bandele.

Tonight: ‘Jews for Black Lives Action & Vigil’ To Call For Police Reform

07/28/2016
Park Slope Stoop

The organization Jews for Racial and Economic Justice (JFREJ) will hold a rally this evening (Thursday, July 28) which will begin at 7pm in front of the Barclays Center. The rally will then proceed down Atlantic Avenue towards Brooklyn Heights. The march will culminate in front of the Brooklyn Detention Complex at 275 Atlantic Avenue, where mourners plan to light Yarzheit candles for those lost to police violence.

New York City Policing Reform, Derailed

07/25/2016
New York Times

Two years ago this month, Eric Garner was gang-tackled and smothered by New York City police officers on a Staten Island sidewalk. His death helped to spark a national outcry and a push for better ways of policing the police. Among the reforms sought by the New York City Council are two bills to protect civilians from being harassed and unlawfully searched.

On 2-Year Mark of Eric Garner’s Killing, Speaker Mark-Viverito’s NYPD Side-Deal Criticized As Charade

Moms of Garner & Ramarley Graham’s, advocates and council members committed to real reform announce continued push for Right to Know Act passage into law, ignoring Speaker-NYPD agreement

Community members convey risk in delaying police accountability reforms, highlight NYC as dangerous model of political obstruction that allows police abuses, brutality and killings to continue nationally

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