Right to Know Act

The Right To Know Act is a legislative package that aims to protect the civil and human rights of New Yorkers while promoting communication, transparency and accountability in everyday interactions between the NYPD and the public.  New Yorkers want to live in a safe city where the police treat all residents with dignity and respect, and where police are not considered to be above the law.

Change of Commissioner Spotlights De Blasio’s Record on Police Reform

08/05/2016
Gotham Gazette

Many believe that the biggest responsibility of the Mayor of New York City is to keep people safe and Bill de Blasio has largely done that, in no small part by letting his lightning-rod police commissioner, Bill Bratton, call the shots on public safety policy. The mayor has focused on pre-kindergarten and affordable housing while Bratton has governed the streets, helping bring crime down to historic lows.

As Mayor Touts 'Neighborhood Policing,' Questions Remain About What It Is

08/08/2016
DNAinfo

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS — The NYPD's incoming commissioner James O'Neill is the perfect person for the job because he helped develop the city's expanding neighborhood policing program, where officers spend more time getting to know the communities they patrol, Mayor Bill de Blasio said when announcing O'Neill's promotion last week.

NY1 Online: Panel of Activists Discusses Changing Leadership at NYPD, Hopes for Reform

08/05/2016
NY1 / Inside City Hall
Days after Police Commissioner Bill Bratton announced his retirement from the NYPD, Errol Louis discussed the changing leadership at the department, plus hopes for reform, with a panel of activists: Beverly Tillery from the Anti-Violence Project, Robert Gangi of the Police Reform Organizing Project, Yul-san Liem of the Justice Committee and Jose Lopez from Make the Road New York.

Bratton's Imminent Departure Reignites Debate Around Set of Police Reform Bills with Support in City Council

08/05/2016
NY1

Police Commissioner William Bratton's imminent departure from the NYPD is reigniting a debate around a set of police reform bills with widespread support in the City Council. NY1's Grace Rauh filed the ofllowing report.

Police officers will be expected to offer a business card after searching someone and in some instances, be required to ask for permission before conducting a search at all. Both are reforms the NYPD agreed to adopt in a deal reached with the City Council last month.

Change of Commissioner Spotlights De Blasio’s Record on Police Reform

08/05/2016
Gotham Gazette

Many believe that the biggest responsibility of the Mayor of New York City is to keep people safe and Bill de Blasio has largely done that, in no small part by letting his lightning-rod police commissioner, Bill Bratton, call the shots on public safety policy. The mayor has focused on pre-kindergarten and affordable housing while Bratton has governed the streets, helping bring crime down to historic lows.

Incoming Commissioner James O'Neill says NYPD will follow Bill Bratton's lead in deal to avoid police reforms

08/04/2016
New York Daily News

Incoming Police Commissioner James O’Neill said he’ll stick to a controversial deal with the City Council on identification and search rules — prompting a clash with some police reform advocates before he’s even started the job.

O’Neill, the current Chief of Department who will take over for Bill Bratton, said he’d stick to the deal his predecessor made to avoid a vote on two bills called the Right to Know Act.

CPR Slams Chief O’Neill for Supporting Backroom Political Deal without Touted “Community Engagement”

In response to NYPD Chief James O’Neill, named successor to Commissioner Bratton, announcing his support for the deal Speaker Mark-Viverito and Commissioner Bratton struck in an attempt to block the Right to Know Act police reforms, Communities United for Police Reform released the following statement from spokesperson Mark Winston Griffith, executive director of Brooklyn Movement Center.

Jews of color hold Black Lives Matter march Downtown

08/01/2016
Brooklyn Daily

Jews must support the Black Lives Matter movement to fight for the rights of people of color in their own religion, said dozens of Jewish activists who rallied for police reform Downtown on July 28.

“Black Lives Matter is a Jewish issue because there are black Jews,” said April Baskin, vice president of the Union for Reform Judaism congregation, who came all the way from D.C. for the event. “The freedom and safety of black people is tied to our Jewish values for justice and safety for everyone. Our country collectively has not been vocal enough.”

Cop's use of force against Bronx Assemblyman reminder of NYPD reform work to be done

08/01/2016
New York Daily News

On Saturday, Assembly Member Michael Blake, at an event in his district, was forcibly restrained by a NYPD officer while trying to gain information about an incident that was occurring. He was released after a senior officer recognized him as an elected official.

The incident has many remembering a situation that took place in 2011, when I and Kirsten John Foy, who was working for then Public Advocate Bill de Blasio, were detained by police during the West Indian Day Parade.

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