In the Media

Police accountability bills fall short for some activists

12/21/2017
News12

Two bills on police accountability passed by the City Council this week, but some activists who originally pushed for them say they aren't satisfied.

Intro 541 of the Right to Know Act requires officers to clearly explain that searches are completely voluntary and only allows searches if consent is given. The second bill, Intro 182, requires officers to identify themselves, offer a business card and provide an explanation for police activity.

Right To Know Act Passes NYC Council Despite Opposition

12/19/2017
Patch

The New York City Council passed a pair of landmark police-reform bills Tuesday — one by a wide margin and one more narrowly — that aim to impose strict rules on how NYPD cops search and question New Yorkers.

Introduction 541-C, which would require the NYPD to instruct officers on how to get consent from people they search without a warrant, passed 37 votes to 13 at the Council's last meeting of the year. The bill would also require the Police Department to develop policies for recording such searches and explicitly telling civilians that they can refuse to be searched.

NYC Council Passes Police Reform Bills Amid Opposition to Last-Minute Compromise

12/19/2017
Observer

The City Council passed the Right to Know Act, a package of police reform bills, despite opposition from some Council members over a last-minute compromise made to appease the NYPD.

One bill, sponsored by Bronx Councilman Ritchie Torres, a speaker candidate, mandates that cops to identify themselves when making a stop. This bill was changed to have the identification requirement only cover stops involving suspicion of criminal activity. The other bill, sponsored by Brooklyn Councilman Antonio Reynoso, requires cops to ask for permission before searching an individual.

One step forward, two steps back: Getting police reform right

12/18/2017
City and State New York

This Tuesday, New York City Council members will vote on the two-headed package of bills known as the Right To Know Act. The original two pieces of legislation, that are now versions, Intro 541-C and Intro 182-D, were drafted in an effort to improve police accountability, communication and transparency during police encounters.

‘Right to Know’ bill loses support of key groups, including Legal Aid Society

The 'Right to Know Act' is losing support for one of its bills, as critics claim it will ultimately create loopholes that police officers could exploit. (Credit: Charles Eckert)
12/17/2017
amNewYork

City Council legislation meant to force NYPD officers to identify themselves in certain nonemergency encounters — and distribute business cards when there is no arrest or summons — is continuing to lose support from foes of police misconduct.

The groups say the bill ultimately creates loopholes that cops can exploit.

NYC Council Shouldn’t Take City Backwards by Undermining Police Reform

12/17/2017
Huffington Post

Last week, New York City government took a step forward and also a step backwards on police accountability. The half of the Right to Know Act sponsored by Council Member Antonio Reynoso (Intro 541-C) remains in an effective form that will help protect New Yorkers from unconstitutional searches. It is a testament to his strong leadership and skilled legislative negotiating, and should be passed by the City Council.

‘Right to Know’ bill loses support of key groups, including Legal Aid Society

12/17/2017
AMNY

City Council legislation meant to force NYPD officers to identify themselves in certain nonemergency encounters — and distribute business cards when there is no arrest or summons — is continuing to lose support from foes of police misconduct.

The groups say the bill ultimately creates loopholes that cops can exploit.

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