Right to Know Act

The Right To Know Act is a legislative package that aims to protect the civil and human rights of New Yorkers while promoting communication, transparency and accountability in everyday interactions between the NYPD and the public.  New Yorkers want to live in a safe city where the police treat all residents with dignity and respect, and where police are not considered to be above the law.

Families of New Yorkers Killed by NYPD Announce Support for Right to Know Act

In response to a City Council hearing on several policing reforms, the surviving family members of New Yorkers killed by the NYPD over the past two decades released the following joint statement.

“As family members of New Yorkers killed by the NYPD over the past two decades, we know first-hand that the rights of New Yorkers are too often disregarded by the NYPD.

“There's a clear imbalance of power between police officers and community members in daily interactions, and the rights of New Yorkers must be protected. There must be accountability, transparency & respectful communication in the most common daily interactions, whether on the street, in our cars or in our homes.

CPR Statement Re: City Council Scheduling Hearing on the Right to Know Act for Monday, June 29

In response to the City Council scheduling a hearing on the Right to Know Act legislative package and other legislation related to the police department, Communities United for Police Reform released the following statement from spokesperson Adilka Pimentel.

Improving Police-Community Relations

05/19/2015
Capital Tonight - Time Warner Cable News

President Obama is pushing for more community policing and less use of military grade equipment. The White House has released the final report from a special task force on policing. The goal was to find ways to improve the relationship between citizens and the police after a series of high-profile deaths. Jose Lopez of Make the Road New York served on the task force and joined us to talk about efforts on both the state and federal level.

After Obama Policing Task Force Endorses Right to Know Act, Advocates and Elected Officials Call for NYC Council to Schedule Hearing and Pass Legislation

President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing cited provisions of legislation in final report among critical recommendations to improve policing released during Obama Camden visit

A day after the President Obama-appointed Task Force on 21st Century Policing released its final report, which endorsed policies advanced by the pending Right to Know Act in the New York City Council, advocates and elected officials called for New York to demonstration national leadership by scheduling a hearing and passing the legislation.

Communities United for Police Reform Responds to President Obama’s Policing Task Force’s Final Report

Call for action on recommendations mirroring proposals pending before New York State and New York City

In response to President Obama announcing the release of the final report by the President’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing, Communities United for Police Reform released the following statement from spokesperson Joo-Hyun Kang.

Fact Sheet: Right To Know Act

The Right To Know Act is a legislative package that aims to protect the civil and human rights of New Yorkers while promoting communication, transparency and accountability in everyday interactions between the NYPD and the public.  New Yorkers want to live in a safe city where the police treat all residents with dignity and respect, and where police are not considered to be above the law.

NYPD Reform Advocates and New York City Council Members Announce New Legislation to Improve Communication between Police and Residents

The Right to Know Act, new commonsense legislation introduced in the City Council, will improve communication between police officers and residents, and defuse conflict before it escalates. It is designed to rebuild trust between communities of color and the NYPD.
New Yorkers often have no idea why they are being questioned, stopped or searched, and don’t feel empowered to ask the identity of police officers interacting with them. The Right to Know Act, legislation introduced today by Council Members Ritchie Torres and Antonio Reynoso, would help solve that problem. It has strong support from Communities United for Police Reform (CPR), community groups, local residents, and advocates.

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