In the Media

Stop Stopping Stop-and-Frisk Law, Say Activists

Epoch Times

NEW YORK — Community activists said on Friday that the battle to stop the NYPD from engaging in biased-based profiling isn’t over.

Back in August, after a long political battle, the City Council passed Local Law 71. The law is designed to curb the NYPD’s profiling based on factors like race, religion, sexual orientation, or housing status.

In October, the police union responded with a lawsuit to block the law.

At a Communities United for Police Reform press event at City Hall on Friday, activists called on the Police Union to drop the lawsuit.

Activists Rally at City Hall in Support of Community Safety Act

NY1 News

Activists took to the steps of City Hall Friday to rally in support of non-discrimination laws, which the police union is trying to get rid of.

Last year, the City Council passed the Community Safety Act over the veto of then-Mayor Michael Bloomberg.

The law makes it easier for people to sue the New York City Police Department if they felt they had been profiled.

The Patrolman's Benevolent Association filed a lawsuit against the legislation.

They say it unfairly punishes officers who are trying to do their job.

Bill de Blasio appoints William Bratton Police Commissioner, reactions pour in

New York Daily News

Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio's pick for Police Commissioner prompted a range of reactions across the city Thursday.

Prominent New Yorkers, the police unions and civil rights groups at loggerheads with the NYPD over "stop-and-frisk" policing all weighed in on the selection of former top cop Bill Bratton to replace outgoing Police Commissioner Ray Kelly.

Communities United for Police Reform hosts forum on policing and redefining public safety

New York Amsterdam News

Last week, Communities United for Police Reform hosted an open dialogue at the Talking Transition tent in Chelsea on the future of public safety in New York City. A panel of social justice advocates engaged in social discourse and discussed issues that highlighted a direction the de Blasio administration should take on policing community safety to keep our streets safe without discrimination.

New report on stop and frisk policy

Attorney General’s Office shares new findings after studying arrests
Queens Chronicle

The stop and frisk debate continues and now a new study has been thrown into the mix.

The New York Attorney General’s Office released a report last week that supports the claim that the policy targets mostly young men of color and did not reduce crime.

“Supporters and opponents of the practice agree that only 6 percent of all stops result in an arrest,” the report reads. “Yet until now, no known study has sought to assess what happens following those arrests.”

Four police unions plan to file stop-and-frisk appeal

Capital NY

The Patrolmen's Benevolent Association and three other police unions announced today they will file an appeal to intervene in the stop-and-frisk case in anticipation of mayor-elect Bill de Blasio's withdrawal of the city's challenge to the suit.

The four unions representing 29,000 police officers, detectives, lieutenants and and captains plans to file the motion with the U.S. Court of Appeals in the Second Circuit. This marks the second time the law-enforcement unions are attempting to be part of the case.

CNN’s Don Lemon on ‘stop and frisk’: ‘Would you rather be politically correct or safe and alive?’

The Raw Story

CNN anchor Don Lemon credited the heavily-criticized “stop and frisk” approach by New York City police with a dramatic reduction in local crime in a radio commentary on Tuesday, and suggested that tampering with it would hurt not just the city’s residents, but its economy.

Officials and Community Groups Disappointed by Stop and Frisk Decision

The decision by a federal appeals court to block changes to New York’s stop and frisk program has drawn sharp criticism.
BET News

The ruling by a federal appeals court to block the widespread changes to the controversial stop and friskprogram of the New York Police Department has drawn a widespread disappointment and criticism from elected officials and activists.

Protests Halt Kelly’s Speech at Brown University

New York Times
A speech by Police Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly at Brown University planned for Tuesday was canceled after protesters against the Police Department’s stop-and-frisk tactics disrupted the event with shouting and chants. Officials at the university, in Providence, R.I., ended the event and cleared the auditorium after the protests continued for almost half an hour, preventing Mr. Kelly from speaking. He had been scheduled to deliver a speech titled “Proactive Policing in America’s Biggest City.”